Android Automotive

Android Automotive

Android operating system version for car infotainment systems
.mw-parser-output .hatnote{font-style:italic}.mw-parser-output div.hatnote{padding-left:1.6em;margin-bottom:0.5em}.mw-parser-output .hatnote i{font-style:normal}.mw-parser-output .hatnote+link+.hatnote{margin-top:-0.5em}This article is about the operating system tailored for cars. For the application intended for using an Android device in a vehicle, see Android Auto.

Android Automotive aka Android Automotive OS or AAOS is a variation of Google’s Android operating system, tailored for its use in vehicle dashboards. Introduced in March 2017,[1] the platform was developed by Google and Intel,[2] together with car manufacturers such as Volvo and Audi.[3] The project aims to provide an operating system codebase for vehicle manufacturers to develop their own version of the operating system. Besides infotainment tasks, such as messaging, navigation and music playback, the operating system aims to handle vehicle-specific functions such as controlling the air conditioning.[3]

In contrast to Android Auto, Android Automotive is a full operating system running on the vehicle’s device, not relying on a smartphone to operate.[4]

Android Automotive is an open source operating system and as such, a car manufacturer can use it without the Google Automotive Services (GAS),[5][better source needed] which are a collection of applications and services (Google Maps, Google Play, Google Assistant, etc.) that OEMs can license and integrate into their in-vehicle infotainment systems. Volvo, Ford and GM are using AAOS with GAS, where Stellantis didn’t licence GAS and uses Alexa and TomTom.

Contents

  • 1 History
  • 2 Vehicles with Android Automotive
  • 3 See also
  • 4 References
  • 5 External links

History[edit]

The operating system was first announced by Google in March 2017.

In February 2018, Polestar (Volvo’s brand for electric performance cars) announced the Polestar 2, the first car with built-in Android Automotive. The Polestar 2 with Android Automotive is available since July 2020.[6]

In September 2018, the Renault–Nissan–Mitsubishi Alliance announced a technology partnership to embed the Android Automotive operating system in the group’s vehicles starting in 2021.[7]

In April 2019 Google opened up the APIs for developers to start developing applications for Android Automotive.[1]

In September 2019 General Motors announced that they will use Android Automotive to power the infotainment systems in its cars starting in 2021.[8]

In July 2020, Stellantis (formerly Groupe PSA and FCA Group) announced they would power their infotainment systems with Android Automotive OS, from 2023.[9]
Some vehicles from the group, like the 2021 Dodge Durango and Chrysler Pacifica, are already using the Android Automotive-based Uconnect 5,[10] without the Google Automotive Services (GAS).[11]

In February 2021, Ford announced a partnership with Google that would bring Android Automotive to Ford and Lincoln vehicles, starting in 2023.[12]

In May 2021, Lucid Motors revealed that the Lucid Air was using Android Automotive for its infotainment system,[13] but without the Google Automotive Services (GAS).

In September 2021, Honda announced that it would use Google’s Android Automotive OS in its cars starting in 2022.[14]

Vehicles with Android Automotive[edit]

  • 2020 Polestar 2
  • 2022 GMC Hummer EV
  • 2022 GMC Yukon
  • 2022 Chevrolet Tahoe
  • 2022 Chevrolet Suburban
  • 2022 Chevrolet Silverado[15]
  • 2023 Cadillac Lyriq[16]
  • 2022 Renault Mégane E-Tech Electric[17]
  • 2021 Volvo XC40 P8
  • 2021 Volvo XC40 Recharge
  • 2021 Volvo C40 Recharge
  • 2022 Volvo XC60
  • 2022 Volvo S90
  • 2022 Volvo V90
  • 2022 Volvo V90 Cross Country

See also[edit]

  • QNX

References[edit]

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  • ^ a b .mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:”””””””‘””‘”}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg”)right 0.1em center/12px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:none;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflink{font-weight:inherit}”Google opens Android Automotive to app developers”. VentureBeat. May 2019.
  • ^ “Developing Amazing Android Automotive In-vehicle Infotainment Experiences”. Intel.
  • ^ a b “No, Android Auto is not an Infotainment OS; Make Way for Android Automotive!”. 2017-06-13. Retrieved 2020-09-19.
  • ^ “What is Android Automotive?”. youtube.
  • ^ “Differentiating Android Automotive with AOSP & Google Services”. 2020-07-29.
  • ^ “First European Polestar 2 customer car delivered”. www.polestar.com. Retrieved 2020-09-08.
  • ^ “Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi and Google join forces on Next-Generation infotainment”. Nissan Global Newsroom. September 2018.
  • ^ O’Kane, Sean (2019-09-05). “GM will use Google’s embedded Android Automotive OS in cars starting in 2021”. The Verge. Retrieved 2019-09-14.
  • ^ “Android Automotive will run natively on vehicles from Vauxhall, Opel, Peugeot, more”. 9to5Google. July 2020.
  • ^ “Hands-on with Stellantis’ new Android-based Uconnect 5 infotainment”. Ars Technica. February 2021.
  • ^ “What is Android Automotive?”.
  • ^ “Here’s Why We’re Co-Creating Our Future with Google”. Medium. February 2021.
  • ^ Korosec, Kirsten (2021-05-27). “Lucid Motors reveals all the tech inside its all-electric Air sedan”. TechCrunch. Retrieved 2021-07-27.
  • ^ “Honda and Google Collaborate on In-vehicle Connected Services”. Honda Newsroom. September 2021.
  • ^ “The 2022 Chevrolet Silverado gets a tech upgrade, hands-free trailering and a new ZR2 off-road flagship”. TechCrunch. September 2021.
  • ^ “Cadillac Lyriq EV features Android Automotive with wide landscape touchscreen”. 9to5Google. September 2021.
  • ^ “Qualcomm Works with Google to Bring Premium and Intelligent In-Vehicle Experiences to Renault Group’s Mégane E-TECH Electric”. Qualcomm.com. September 2021.
  • External links[edit]

    • Android Automotive page at the AOSP

    Integrated development
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    Retrieved from “https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Android_Automotive&oldid=1047677417”

    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Android_Automotive



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