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List of masters of Trinity College, Cambridge

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The Master’s lodge is located in Great Court, Trinity College.

Trinity College, a constituent college of the University of Cambridge, is headed by a master who oversees the general operation of the college. The role is officially appointmented by the monarch at the recommendation of the college, and involves presiding over meetings of the college council and its governing body, although the executive powers of the master are limited.[1] In addition, the master supports relations with students and alumni of the college, and serves as an ambassador for its global development activity.[2]

In 1546, Trinity College was founded by Henry VIII, merging the colleges of Michaelhouse and King’s Hall.[3] John Redman, then Warden of King’s Hall, was thus appointed first Master of Trinity College, and there has always been a master of the college since. For much of the past, the master was required to hold a degree from the University of Cambridge, and was usually a member of Trinity College. The office of the master could be held until the age of seventy, although this could be extended to seventy-five, by decree of the fellowship.[1]

Currently, the master holds office for a fixed term of up to eight years. There is no longer a requirement to have studied at Trinity College, or the University of Cambridge. Recent masters have usually been distinguished academics. The current master, Dame Sally Davies, was appointed on 8 February 2019. She assumed the role during a ceremony on 8 October of that year, becoming the 39th Master of Trinity College, and the first woman to hold the position.[4][5] There have been 40 appointments to the position; William Bill was appointed master twice, in 1551 and 1558.[6] Regardless of whether the incumbent is male or female, the title is referred to as the master, for historical reasons.[2] The college council also includes a vice-master role, currently held by Louise Merrett.[7]

The Master of Trinity College resides in the Master’s Lodge, located directly opposite the main gate in Great Court. It was originally built in 1554, and is a Grade I listed building. The entrance hall has 16th century panelling, and the drawing room has a late 15th century plaster ceiling. The façade of the building towards Great Court was renovated between 1841 and 1843 by Anthony Salvin. In 1892, the architect Arthur Blomfield constructed the west wing of the lodge with additional rooms for private accomodation of the master, which freed some of the historic rooms for public use.[8] The Master’s Lodge is customarily the royal residence when visiting the university.[9] It includes a state bedroom that was refurbished for the 1843 visit of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert.[10][11]

Several masters of the college contributed to the development of its buildings throughout history. Thomas Nevile, master of the college from 1593, remodelled the majority of the college buildings. He demolished several buildings to clear space for Great Court, which is now reputedly the largest enclosed courtyard in Europe.[12] Upon his death, he bequeathed a sum of money which entirely paid for the construction of Nevile’s Court.[13] In the late 17th century, Nevile’s Court was further developed by Christopher Wren under the instruction of the master of the college, Isaac Barrow, forming the Wren Library.[14] In the 1860s, William Whewell paid for the construction of Whewell’s Court, two neo-Gothic courts located on the opposite side of Trinity Street.[15]

List of masters[edit]

Nevile’s Court, Trinity College
Isaac Newton, student of Isaac Barrow
Several masters of the college are commemorated in the chapel
Statue of Isaac Barrow by Matthew Noble in Trinity College Chapel
Whewell’s Court, Trinity College
Statue of William Whewell by Thomas Woolner in the chapel

References[edit]

  • ^ a b .mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit;word-wrap:break-word}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:”””””””‘””‘”}.mw-parser-output .citation:target{background-color:rgba(0,127,255,0.133)}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-free.id-lock-free a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited.id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration.id-lock-registration a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription.id-lock-subscription a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg”)right 0.1em center/12px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:none;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;color:#d33}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{color:#d33}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#2C882D;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right{padding-right:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflink{font-weight:inherit}html.skin-theme-clientpref-night .mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{color:#18911F}html.skin-theme-clientpref-night .mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error,html.skin-theme-clientpref-night .mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{color:#f8a397}@media(prefers-color-scheme:dark){html.skin-theme-clientpref-os .mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error,html.skin-theme-clientpref-os .mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{color:#f8a397}html.skin-theme-clientpref-os .mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{color:#18911F}}”The Master of Trinity”. Trinity College Cambridge. Retrieved 8 May 2024.
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